Art and Culture Center of Hollywood Distance Learning

January 22, 2019 | Author: Ambrose Cain | Category: N/A
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Short Description

1 Art and Culture Center of Hollywood Distance Learning Integrated Art Lesson Title: Description and Overall Focus: Clay...

Description

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood Distance Learning Integrated Art Lesson Title:

Clay Gift Balls

Description and Overall Focus:

Students will learn about the story of the Clay Balls, the clay jewelry of Camille Young, and will create their own “surprise-filled” ball to give to a special friend or family member. They will also learn about caves in Florida.

Length of Lesson

45 min. – 1 hour

Grade Range

ESE

Sunshine State Standards

(see attached)

Objective(s)

Students will take self-drying clay and create a round ball (while inserting a surprise inside) and will enclose the Clay Ball story to go along with this special gift.

Materials: PLEASE NOTE: Some materials must be acquired prior to this lesson

1 plastic zip lock bag 1 copy of the Clay Ball story per student 1 6 inch piece of ribbon 1 penny, dime or special small gift for each ball White Crayola Model Magic modeling clay Pencil and an eraser Paper plate for mixing colors Tempera paint or colored markers Brushes for painting Paper towels for clean-up Optional: Small cardboard box to place their Clay Balls in.

Introductory activity

The first part of this lesson will expose students to the story of the Clay Balls. Students will discuss the meaning of the story and how it is important to treat people equally and as important “jewels.” They will also learn what a cave is and the fact that there are caves found in Florida. They then will see examples of some of the work of Camille Young who uses clay to make fabulous jewelry (some of which looks like round clay balls).

Core activity

Students will begin by taking a small ball of the air dried clay and placing their special gift or money inside. They then will roll the clay into a ball (being careful to keep the surprise from showing). They then will take other bits of clay and add additional designs as shown in some of the examples attached.

When the clay design is complete they will carefully paint the clay and allow it to dry for 24 hours.

Closure activity

As time permits, students will be selected to come forward and share their finished projects and their artistic thought process with other program participants.

Assessment

Students will have learned about creating art from air dried clay with a special “surprise” enclosed. They will learn about the story of the “Clay Balls” and be exposed to the jewelry of Camille Young.

Teacher follow-up idea

Have the students create other “Clay Balls” made especially for friends or family. Have them try to find a distinctive “special gift” to play inside.

Student follow-up idea

Students can visit the web sites below and learn more polymer clay and see all of the fantastic projects they can make.

Book/Web references

Polymer Clay Jewelry by Debbie Jackson www.camileyoung.com http://www.instructables.com/id/How_to_Make_Polymer_Clay_Beads/ http://www.desiredcreations.com/howTo_Desk.htm http://fcit.usf.edu/Florida/default.htm

Art and Culture Center of Hollywood www.artandculturecenter.org Lesson plan prepared by Sherie Tengbergen, artist and educator

JEWELRY BY CAMILLE YOUNG

SUNSHINE STATE STANDARDS - Clay Balls-ESE Arts: Dance *Skills and Techniques (DA.A.1) and (DA.A.2) *Creation and Communication (DA.B.1) *Cultural and Historical Connections (DA.C.1) *Aesthetic and Critical Analysis (DA.D.1) *Applications to Life (DA.E.1) Arts: Music *Skills and Techniques (MUA.1), (MUA.2) and (MUA.3) *Creation and Communication (MUB.1) and (MUB.2) *Cultural and Historical Connections (MUC.1) *Aesthetic and Critical Analysis (MUD.1) and (MUD.2) *Applications to Life (MUE.1) and (MUE.2) Arts: Theatre *Skills and Techniques (TH.A.1), (TH.A.2) and (TH.A.3) *Creation and Communication (TH.B.1) *Cultural and Historical Connections (TH.C.1) *Aesthetic and Critical Analysis (TH.D.1) *Applications to Life (TH.E.1) Arts: Visual Arts *Skills and Techniques (VA.A.1) *Creation and Communication (VA.B.1) *Cultural and Historical Connections (VA.C.1) *Aesthetic and Critical Analysis (VA.D.1) *Application to Life (VA.E.1) Language Arts *Reading Process (LA.1.1), (LA.1.2), ( LA.1.3), (LA.1.4), (LA.1.6) and (LA.1.7) *Literary Analysis (LA.2.1) and (LA.2.2.) *Writing Process (LA.3.1), (LA.3.2), (LA3.3.), (LA3.4) and (LA3.5) *Writing Applications (LA4.1), (LA4.2) and (LA.4.3) *Communication (LA.5.1) and (LA.5.2) *Information and Media Literacy (LA.6.1), (LA.6.2), (LA.6.3) and (LA.6.4) Mathematics *Number Sense, Concepts, & Operations (MA.A.1), (MA.A.2), (MA.A.3), (MA.A.4) and (MA.A.5.) *Measurement (MA.B.1), (MA.B.2), (MA.B.3) and (MA.B.4) *Geometry and Spatial Sense (MA.C.1), (MA.C.2) and (MA.C.3) *Algebraic Thinking (MA.D.1) and MA.D.2) *Data Analysis and Probability (MA.E.1), (MA.E.2) and (MA.E.3) Science *The Nature of Matter (SC.A.1) and (SC.A.2) *Energy (SC.B.1) and (SC.B.2) *Force and Motion (SC.C.1) and (SC.C.2) *Processes that Shape the Earth (SC.D.1) and (SC.D.2) *Earth and Science (SC.E.1) and (SC.E.2) *Processes of Life (SC.F.1) and (SC.F.2) *How Living Things Interact With Their Environment (SC.G.1) and (SC.G.2) *The Nature of Science (SC.H.1), (SC.H.2) and (SC.H.3) Social Studies *Time, Continuity and Change (History) (SS.A.1), (SS.A.2), (SS.A.3), (SS.A.4) and (SS.A.5) *People, Places and Environments (Geography) (SS.B.1) and (SS.B.2) *Government and the Citizen (Civics and Government) (SS.C.1) and (SS.C.2) *Economics (SS.D.1) and (SS.D.2)

Foreign Language *Communication (FL.A.1) and (FL.A.2) *Culture (FL.B.1)

PreK 2

K 3-5

x x x

x x x

x x x x x

x x x x x

x x

x x

x

x

x x

x x

x

x

MS 6-8

HS 9-12

*Connections (FL.C.1) and (FL.C.2) *Comparisons (FL.D.1) and (FL.D.2) *Experiences (FL.E.1) Health (No standards adopted) Physical Education *Physical Education Literacy (PE.A.1), (PE.A.2), (PE.A.3) *Responsible Physical Activity Behaviors (PE.B.1) and (PE.B.2) *Advocate and Promote Physically Active Lifestyles (PE.C.1) and (PE.C.2)

x

x

NATIONAL ART STANDARDS MET: x

NA-VA.K-4.1 UNDERSTANDING AND APPLYING MEDIA, TECHNIQUES, AND PROCESSES.

x

NA-VA.K-4.2 USING KNOWLEDGE OF STRUCTURES AND FUNCTIONS.

x

NA-VA.K-4.3 CHOOSING AND EVALUATING A RANGE OF SUBJECT MATTER, SYMBOLS, AND IDEAS.

x

NA-VA.K-4.4 UNDERSTANDING THE VISUAL ARTS IN RELATION TO HISTORY AND CULTURES.

x

NA-VA.K-4.5 REFLECTING UPON AND ASSESSING THE CHARACTERISTICS AND MERITS OF THEIR WORK AND THE WORK OF OTHERS

x

NA-VA.K-4.6 MAKING CONNECTIONS BETWEEN VISUAL ARTS AND OTHER DISCIPLINES.

Clay Balls A man was exploring caves by the Seashore. In one of the caves he found a canvas bag with a bunch of hardened clay balls. It was like someone had rolled clay balls and left them out in the sun to bake. They didn't look like much, but they intrigued the man, so he took the bag out of the cave with him. As he strolled along the beach, he would throw the clay balls one at a time out into the ocean as far as he could. He thought little about it, until he dropped one of the clay balls and it cracked open on a rock. Inside was a beautiful, precious stone! Excited, the man started breaking open the remaining clay balls. Each contained a similar treasure. He found thousands of dollars worth of jewels in the 20 or so clay balls he had left. Then it struck him. He had been on the beach a long time. He had thrown maybe 50 or 60 of the clay balls with their hidden treasure into the ocean waves. Instead of thousands of dollars in treasure, he could have taken home tens of thousands, but he had just thrown it away! It's like that with people. We look at someone, maybe even ourselves, and we see the external clay vessel. It doesn't look like much from the outside. It isn't always beautiful or sparkling, so we discount it. We see that person as less important than someone more beautiful or stylish or well known or wealthy. But we have not taken the time to find the treasure hidden inside that person. There is a treasure in each and every one of us. If we take the time to get to know that person, then the clay begins to peel away and the brilliant gem begins to shine forth. May we not come to the end of our lives and find out that we have thrown away a fortune in friendships because the gems were hidden in bits of clay. APPRECIATE EVERY SINGLE THING YOU HAVE, ESPECIALLY YOUR FRIENDS! LIFE IS TOO SHORT AND FRIENDS ARE TOO FEW!

Meatball Surprise • •

5 Servings Prep: 2o min. Cook: 20 min.

Ingredients • • • • • • • • • • •

1 egg 1/2 cup milk 1 cup soft bread crumbs 2 tablespoons dried minced onion 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1 pound lean ground beef (90% lean) 1 block (4 ounces) Monterey Jack cheese, cut into 20 cubes 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 jar (14 ounces) spaghetti sauce 1/2 cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese

Directions •

In a bowl, combine the first six ingredients. Crumble beef over mixture and mix well. Divide into 20 portions and shape each portion around a cheese cube. In a large skillet, brown meatballs in oil; drain. Add spaghetti sauce. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 10 minutes or until the meat is no longer pink. Sprinkle with cheese. Yield: 20 meatballs. *You can enjoy Monterey Jack Meatballs by themselves. But for an even heartier meal, serve with cooked pasta and salad. Or serve on rolls for a deliciously different sandwich. Nutrition Facts: 1 serving (4 each) equals 436 calories, 28 g fat (11 g saturated fat), 126 mg cholesterol, 954 mg sodium, 15 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 30 g protein.

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